In patients with sickle cell disease

Transfusions and Iron Chelation Are Integral for Overall Supportive Care Management

Sickle Cell Disease

Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the most common blood-related genetic disorder worldwide. It is most common in people of sub-Saharan African, India, Saudi Arabia, and Mediterranean countries. More specifically, 19-27% of the African population carries the sickle cell allele. However, due migration patterns, SCD is now also prevalent in Europe. Namely, France and the United Kingdom count SCD as the most prevalent genetic disease, and the rate is increasing in other central and southern Europe countries.1,2

The stiff, sickle-shaped blood cells characterizing SCD prevent oxygen circulation. Pain crises, as well leg ulcers, gallstones, high blood pressure in the lungs, enlarged spleen, stroke and other complications can occur. Newborns should be screened for the disorder, so that treatment can be initiated early.1,3,4

EXCESS IRON CAN ACCUMULATE AND LEAD TO TISSUE TOXICITY

Transfusional iron can lead to debilitating
consequences if left untreated. Learn more about the risks of
iron toxicity in
SCD patients
.

EXJADE PROVIDES ONCE-DAILY ORAL CHELATION

EXJADE can help remove excess iron in patients with transfusion-dependent sickle cell disease.

Learn more